Banned in Boston (or at least in Cambridge)

It seems a fitting end to Banned Book Week that a librarian, Liz Phipps Soerio at the Cambridgeport Elementary School, has refused Melania Trump’s gift of several Dr. Seuss Books that were offered on National Read a Book Day, September 6.  The Washington Post carried the story yesterday.

According to the Post,  “Seuss’s illustrations are “steeped in racist propaganda, caricatures, and harmful stereotypes,” librarian Liz Phipps Soeiro wrote in a letter to Trump on Tuesday.”

“The 10 books on the list are: “Seuss-isms!”; “Because a Little Bug Went KaChoo”; “What Pet Should I Get?”; “The Cat in the Hat”; “I Can Read With My Eyes Shut!”; “One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish”; “The Foot Book”; “Wacky Wednesday”; “Green Eggs and Ham” and “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!”

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3 thoughts on “Banned in Boston (or at least in Cambridge)”

  1. Interesting. I don’t know the Seuss books well enough to comment. But in a country with 91 million (!) people illiterate, I would have thought reading books that entertain and capture the imagination of children can only be good. If some of the pictures are not politically correct, let’s sit down with the children to discuss why.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Would be interesting to see how wide spread this opinion is. It is the first time I have heard of it. Reminds me of the 1980s when to call a young male child (say 12 or under) a boy was deemed very offensive by some mothers. I can see why calling a teenager or an adult a boy would be offensive, but a young male child is usually considered a boy.

      Liked by 1 person

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