Getting Feedback Can Hurt—Here’s How to Ask for It

This is one the best postings I have ever read on how to accept criticism. It acknowledges the “eight year old writer” that still live in most of us. We can start with asking for specific criticism and then work up to where we can accept open criticism on how to improve our work.

BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog

zz-roger_0991By L. Roger Owens

Asking for feedback on your writing is a delicate dance, the steps tricky to learn, as I was reminded when my eight year-old read me her story the other day.

She ran to me with the unlined pages clutched in her hand. I could see how her impossibly small scrawl sloped down the right side of the page; she had to tilt her head slowly, yoga-like, as she read. The story was a barely veiled display of her deep wish to join the family of a wealthy friend. A protagonist (with my daughter’s name) and seven siblings (one of whom is named after her best friend, their parents named for the friend’s parents), have magical powers, but the use of these powers is stymied when one of the siblings falls from a tree and shatters his arm.

She finished with a smile, and as she held…

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4 thoughts on “Getting Feedback Can Hurt—Here’s How to Ask for It”

  1. That’s very good. As a non eight-year old, getting feedback & constructive criticism is best done before one’s work is thrown out into the world to be savaged. And indeed, requesting specific, targeted feedback is good – ideally from a range of people if one is lucky enough to have enough willing sounding boards.

    Happy New Year 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Excellent points. I have writer friends who have gotten to the Alpha and Beta readers stage in their pre-published works. I have a read and critique group that meets once a month. Wish I could find a few more who would be willing to offer constructive criticism that I would be sensible enough to consider. Happy New Year to you also.

      Liked by 1 person

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