Days to Celebrate in March

March is the third month of the year and named after Mars in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. It is the second of seven months to have a length of 31 days. In the Northern Hemisphere, the meteorological beginning of spring occurs on the first day of March. The March equinox on the 20 or 21 marks the astronomical beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and the beginning of autumn in the Southern Hemisphere, where September is the seasonal equivalent of the Northern Hemisphere’s March.

Statue colossale de Mars (Pyrrhus) – MC0058 – Vestibule du Palais des Conservateurs – Muséi Capitolini (Rome).

March begins on the same day of the week as November and ends on the same day of the week as June every year. It begins on the same day of the week as February in common years only. In years preceding common years, it begins and ends on the same day of the week as August of the following year and ends on the same day of the week as November of the following year and in years preceding leap years, it begins and ends on the same day of the week as May of the following year. In common years, it begins on the same day of the week as June of the previous year and in leap years, September and December of the previous year. In common years, March ends on the same day of the week as September of the previous year and in leap years, April and December of the previous year

March is Women’s History Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in commemorating and encouraging the study, observance and celebration of the vital role of women in American history.

It all began with one single day in 1908 in New York City when thousands of women united and marched for better labor laws, conditions, and the right to vote. A year later on February 28, in a gathering organized by members of the Socialist Party, suffragists and socialists gathered again in Manhattan for what they called the first International Woman’s Day.

In 1980 Jimmy Carter signed a proclamation which expanded Women’s History Week to Women’s History Month.

Music is also Music in Our Schools Month.

For more than 30 years, March has been officially designated by the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) for the observance of Music In Our Schools Month® (MIOSM®), the time of year when music education becomes the focus of schools across the nation. 

The purpose of MIOSM is to raise awareness of the importance of music education for all children – and to remind citizens that school is where all children should have access to music. MIOSM is an opportunity for music teachers to bring their music programs to the attention of the school and the community, and to display the benefits that school music brings to students of all ages.

Music is supposed to help children with this math and arithmetic skills. Could it be because of counting out the beat or figuring out how many half, quarter, eighth and triplet notes it takes in one measure of music?

March 16 is Freedom of Information Day.

March 16th recognizes National Freedom of Information Day annually during Sunshine Week. It also commemorates the birthday of President James Madison.  

Madison earned the name the Father of the Constitution and as the foremost advocate for openness in government. Additionally, he is hailed as being instrumental in the drafting of the United States Constitution and as the key champion and author of the United States Bill of Rights. Madison held individual rights and freedom of information in high importance.

  • On March 16, 1751, James Madison, Jr. was born in Port Conway, Virginia.  Madison died on June 28, 1836, on his Montpelier Estate.
  • The people elected James Madison as the 4th President of the United States of America (1809-1817).
  • In 1966, Congress passed the Freedom of Information Act into law.

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