Oh Say Can You See

That the Star Spangled Banner became our National Anthem 90 year ago today when Herbert Hoover signed a congressional resolution on March 3, 1931?

The anthem’s history began the morning of September 14, 1814, when an attorney and amateur poet named Francis Scott Key watched U.S. soldiers—who were under bombardment from British naval forces during the War of 1812—raise a large American flag over Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland.

The poem was set to the tune of a popular British song written by John Stafford Smith for the Anacreontic Society, a men’s social club in London. “To Anacreon in Heaven” (or “The Anacreontic Song”), with various lyrics, was already popular in the United States. This setting, renamed “The Star-Spangled Banner”, soon became a well-known U.S. patriotic song. With a range of 19 semitones, it is known for being very difficult to sing. Although the poem has four stanzas, only the first is commonly sung today.

“The Star-Spangled Banner” was recognized for official use by the United States Navy in 1889, and by U.S. president Woodrow Wilson in 1916, and was made the national anthem by a congressional resolution on March 3, 1931 (46 Stat. 1508, codified at 36 U.S.C. § 301), which was signed by President Herbert Hoover.

Janine Strange, National Anthem Girl was the first person to sing the National Anthem in all 50 states.

12 thoughts on “Oh Say Can You See”

  1. There is an African American teenaged figure skater named Start who does a beautiful short program to Black Like Me
    Part of the lyrics says “If you think this is the land of the free, try being Black like me.”

    Liked by 2 people

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