September 17 is Constitution Day

Celebrated on September 17, Constitution Day, also known as Constitution and Citizenship Day, honors the document that guarantees Americans their essential rights. Since its ratification in 1787, the Constitution of the United States has served as the basis for all U.S. laws.

To prevent the abuses of power they felt subjected to under the British monarchy, the Founding Fathers framed the Constitution carefully, distributing power between three branches of government. The Constitution outlines the government’s powers, the limitations on those powers, and the rights of citizens. It also outlines an amendment process for making changes in the future.

If you listen to politicians, pundits, and even ordinary people pontificate about the US Constitution, most of them have little real idea what they are talking about.

How well do you know the U.S. Constitution? Take the quiz.

15 thoughts on “September 17 is Constitution Day”

  1. Didn’t we do this last year?
    One that I missed was “what is the max number of years someone can be president” I said 8 (2 terms) but it’s 10. OH, yeah, I forgot that if a president dies the Vice President takes over. Here’s my question Pat. If that scenario happened where a VP become P for 3 years, Does that mean they could not then run twice? 3 + 1 term + 1 term = 11?????

    YOUR SCORE IS: 7 OUT OF 10 ON THE CONSTITUTION FACTS QUIZ!
    YOUR CONSTITUTION I.Q. IS: PATRIOT
    THE AVERAGE SCORE FOR PEOPLE FROM NC IS 7.38
    THE AVERAGE SCORE NATIONALLY IS 7.30

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We may have taken this last year, JM–not sure. My guess is that if a VP is president for 3 years he would be precluded from running for a second term on his own. If someone were to challenge it I don’t know what the Supreme Court might do since the Amendment is quite specific.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Thanks, Francisco. I certainly do not know the various articles in-depth, but I do know more than many of our politicians who repeatedly and incorrectly misquote what they believe is in the Constitution. Many can not tell the difference between the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. Sad. May we need a Civics for Elected Dummies.

          Liked by 2 people

          1. I think so, it should be a requirement…or one would think that if one is aiming towards elected office one would become an expert in the law of the land! But that happens in my country too, it is not exclusive to the US. Here we now have many who constantly mention the constitution but know nothing about it. I think that Civics class should be international.

            Liked by 1 person

  2. I scored ten out of ten, but must admit to having read the first comment before taking the test. Otherwise I would have had to guess at the max number of years one can be President, and with Trump in mind and wishful thinking, I’d have said zero.

    Liked by 1 person

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