The Green Books that Preceded the Movie

Green Book 1940The New York Public Library has blogged about the Green Books that were the genesis for this year’s Academy Award Winner for Best Picture.

From 1936 to 1966, Victor Hugo Green, a postal worker who worked in New Jersey and lived in Harlem, published the directories known today as the Green Book. The actual titles included The Negro Motorist Green Book, The Negro Travelers’ Green Book, and The Travelers’ Green Book. The books listed hotels, restaurants, beauty salons, nightclubs, bars, and gas stations where Black travelers would be welcome. In an age of sundown towns, segregation, and lynching, the Green Book became an indispensable tool for safe navigation.

The blog post includes a research guide to the Green Books, digitized copies of the Green Books, and an interactive map to map a trip using the Green Books or view a Green Books map.

Advertisements

February 8 – It’s Children’s Authors’ and Illustrators’ Week — re-blog from Celebrate Picture Books!

Read a book to a child or purchase a book to donate to your library or other gift giving opportunity or charity.

via February 8 – It’s Children’s Authors’ and Illustrators’ Week — re-blog from Celebrate Picture Books!

Taking Books to the People,part 10: Book Vending Machines

When you want to feed your hunger, you go to cuisine de machine aka the Vending Machine.  One elementary school is using that same technology to feed the minds of elementary school students.

This was featured as a Good Morning America story on January 30 at the Umatilla Elementary School in Umatilla, FL.  It was the brain child of school media specialist, Susan Caldwell.   The school started gathering books from Scholastic Book Fair points, donations and staff purchases.

According to the school principal, Diane Dwyer, “The children, grades kindergarten through 5th, are able to swap “Bulldog Bucks” for coins to buy books at the machine. “Bulldog Bucks” are tokens earned in exchange for committing a kind act, or working hard on an assignment.”  It was part of a Literacy week promotion and the machine is so popular it already had to be restocked.

A local church has donated a second vending machine so one will focus on K- grade 2 books while the other one will focus on grades 3-5.

vending-books-ht-002-jpo-190130_hpMain_16x9_992

An elementary school in Buffalo, NY had a similar idea  in December 2018.

Global Vending Machine offers the Booworm Book Vending Machine for $3,495 according to their website.

February Days to Celebrate

For a short month, February has more than it’s share of holidays and other days to celebrate.

Ground hogThe month kicks off with Ground Hog Day on February 2.  Also known as Imbolc: Summoning of the Flame.  Is Winter on it’s way out?  Will Spring arrive early?  Only the Ground Hog may know for sure.

blackhistorymonthcivilrightsFebruary is also Black History Month and Library Lover’s Month. Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month in the U.S., is an annual observance in Canada, Ireland, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States. It began as a way for remembering important people and events in the history of the African diaspora.

Library Lover’s Month “is dedicated to the people who love whole buildings devoted to the reading, housing, organizing, categorizing, finding, studying and otherwise loving books.”  It’s not all free and on the Internet.

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.

Marcus Tullius Cicero

saferinternetdaySafer Internet Day is February 5. “This year’s Safer Internet Day (SID) celebrations will take place on Tuesday, 5 February 2019. The campaign’s slogan, “Together for a better internet“, is a call to action for all stakeholders to join together and play their part in creating a better internet for everyone, and especially for younger users.”

Presidents figure prominently in February.  Abraham Lincoln’s, 16th president, birthday is celebrated on February 12th and Presidents Day (which is celebrated around George Washington’s (1st president) birthday on February 22) is February 18th this year.  An easy way to see a portrait of either president is to find George’s portrait on a $1 bill and Lincoln’s on a $5 bill.

washingtonandlincoln

Love Your Pet Day, celebrated on February 20, is a good way to remember your dog, cat, snake, fish, turtle, horse, cow, amadillo, hamster, gerbil, frog, rock or whatever type of pet you have.

loveyourpetday

Happy February.

 

Reblog: GPO’S GOVINFO MAKES HISTORY BY EARNING GLOBAL CERTIFICATION FOR TRUSTWORTHINESS

The U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO) makes history by becoming the first organization in the United States and second organization in the world to achieve the highest global standard of excellence for digital repositories. The Primary Trustworthy Digital Repository Authorization Body Ltd. awarded GPO ISO 16363:2012 for govinfo, the one-stop site to authentic, published Government information. GPO achieved the certification by meeting official criteria for trustworthy repositories as defined by experts in the field.

ISO is the International Organization for Standardization and the world’s largest developer of international standards used by Government, business and new information technology companies. The standard achieved by GPO outlines the expectations for digital repositories to be certified as “trustworthy,” meaning that they are implementing digital preservation practices to ensure long-term preservation and access. Certification under ISO 16363 will provide assurance to the public that govinfo is a standards-compliant digital archive in which Government information will be preserved, accessible, and usable into the long-term future. The certification demonstrates that not only the documents themselves, but also the organizational structures and systems around those documents, maintain integrity.

“This certification reconfirms GPO’s mission of providing the public authentic, published information on the three branches of the Federal Government,” said GPO Acting Deputy Director Herbert H. Jackson, Jr. “I am proud of our employees for attaining this certification, which emphasizes the important work GPO does for our country.”

Certification has been a key GPO strategic initiative since 2015. GPO was evaluated against 109 criteria that assessed GPO’s organizational infrastructure (adequate staffing, staff knowledge, policies and procedures), digital object management (content management and access), and security risk management (plans in case of a system failure).

Learn more about GPO’s path to ISO 16363:2012 Audit and Certification: https://www.fdlp.gov/preservation/trusted-digital-repository-iso-16363-2012-audit-and-certification.

 

An Innovative Way to Use Your Books to Create Art

There was a  bibliofile  who loved books and shoes

But she had so many books she did not know what to do.

Yad Vashem books burnt by the Nazi

This book owner has learned a creative way to use her books as art.

over the moon bookstore and galleryReblogged from the Book Candy section of Over the Moon Bookstore presents Shelf Awareness.:  My Modern Met showcased a book lover who “arranges her huge library of novels into imaginative scenes.”

The colorful pictures are incredible from a mermaid to ying/yang.

 

Book Art Book Displays by Elizabeth Sagan

USS Midway and the Naval Institute Proceedings Project

proceedings-first-issueOne of the USS Midway  Carrier Museum Library’s projects is a joint project with the US Naval Institute  in Annapolis, MD.  The Proceedings has been published since  1874 and is one of the oldest continually published magazine in the United States. From Wikipedia;

Proceedings covers topics concerning global security and includes articles from military professionals and civilian experts, historical essays, book reviews, full-color photography, and reader commentary. Roughly a third are written by active-duty personnel, a third by retired military, and a third by civilians. Proceedings also frequently carries feature articles by Secretaries of Defense, Secretaries of the Navy, Chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and top leaders of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard.

Phil Eakins is the project lead.  From  the USS Midway Library webpage.

In a joint project with the U.S. Naval Institute (USNI), we have volunteers reading every article in the Proceedings back to 1874. These volunteers catalog and summarize all important articles from each issue. The volunteer team compiling summaries for the U.S. Naval Institute (USNI) Proceedings Database cruised into its fourth year of work recently in what appears to be a 10-year project. The searchable database, which will eventually be accessible via the USS Midway Museum and USNI websites, will provide interested parties with a valuable research tool heretofore unavailable. Over 5,000 summaries have been completed of a target set of over 12,500 main articles covering the period 1874 to date. As part of the join project, USNI has recently digitized its entire Proceedings collection and will soon have that available on their website.

Phil was kind enough to send me a VT-8 related summary from the Proceedings Project.  Ferrier, the wounded sailor from the VT-8 blog post, wrote this piece when he was a lieutenant in 1964.

 

usni photo of topedo squadron eight
USNI Photo from Ferrier’s article in USNI Proceedings, Oct 1964

 

USNI Proceedings, October 1964, pg. 72

Title: Torpedo Squadron Eight, the Other Chapter

Author: Lt. H. H. Ferrier, USN

Summary by: Bill O’Hara

Torpedo Squadron Eight (VT-8) was commissioned at Norfolk, Virginia, in the late summer of 1941 as an element of carrier Air Group Eight, better known then as the Hornet Air Eight. The first commanding officer of Torpedo Eight, who also led the squadron in their fateful flight, was Lieutenant Commander John C. Waldron, U.S. Navy, a veteran of more than 20 years of naval service. The first aircraft assigned to the squadron were SBN-18s, which were a mid-wing design of the Brewster Aircraft Company, manufactured by the Naval Aircraft Factory, Philadelphia and were used to provide pilot training for this newly commissioned squadron. Following a shakedown cruise by the USS Hornet and her embarked air group in January 1942, the Hornet left Norfolk with the main portion of the squadron and headed for the Pacific.  She left behind a detachment of 80 officers and men who were to be sent to the Grumman factory on Long Island to learn as much as possible about the airplane from the engineers and builders before taking delivery of the new Grumman Avengers (the Avenger tag was given to the airplane after the Battle of Midway to exemplify the mission and dedication of all torpedo squadrons – to avenge the heroic sacrifice of their predecessors.) During this time of testing the new airplane, the first high-speed torpedo drops of a newly designed torpedo which was capable of surviving drop speeds of 125 knots and 125 – 150 feet of altitude were made. Following completion of these tests the planes were flown across country to San Diego to join their shipmates in the Pacific on the Hornet. Because the Hornet was at sea in the Pacific the planes were loaded onto the USS Kitty Hawk (APV-1) in San Diego for transport to Ford Island in Hawaii. Following arrival in Hawaii a message came from Midway Island for volunteers to fly six of the Avengers to Midway.  Upon arrival the planes were prepared for combat which included loading one each of the newly tested torpedoes and ammunition for the two .30 caliber machine guns and the .50 caliber gun. On the morning of June 4, unknown planes were spotted approaching Midway Island and the order was given to take off and find the Japanese carrier force that had been sighted some 15 miles off the coast.  The Japanese force consisted of four carriers and seventeen other ships in formation.  The six Avengers were attacked almost immediately after they had sighted the enemy ships and were outnumbered six to one by Japanese fighters.  Only one of the Avengers made it safely back to Midway Island with one of its gunners killed and the pilot and other gunner severely injured.  Overwhelming odds claimed the other five planes and their crewmembers on that fateful day. Keywords: Naval battles.

 

Maker:S,Date:2017-11-30,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-Y
Bonnie and Pat share the Midway Magic on the Road–at the Naval Institute Proceedings in Annapolis, Mar 2018
Phil get's his 9000 hr award  Apr 2016.JPG
Phil upon getting his 9000 hour pin (He now has over 13,000 volunteer hours.)

 

He Who Steals My Purse Stills Trash, but He Who Steals My Book….

quill pen and parchmentBack in the Middle Ages, when books were written by hand in natural light only (because candles were deemed too dangerous around the books), the best way to prevent a book from being stolen or damaged was to include a book curse. (Fortunately most people believed in such things then. )

Nowadays libraries and archives rely on theft detection strips, sensitizing/desensitizing stations, , traffic control, and surveillance measures.  (Most people do not seem as susceptible to curses these days.)  Unfortunately, thefts from both regular and special collections seems to be on the rise.  It can be books, documents, artifacts, or parts of the same.

On my last trip to the  National Archives in College Park, Maryland, there was a rogues’ gallery of known archive thieves at the entrance to the second floor research center.

Why do we steal?  Do we want the secret satisfaction of owning/handling/seeing something that nobody else will have access too?  Do we think we are getting something over on the Man or Woman?