A Mutual Inclination

I wanted to hike
but the body declined
I wanted to study
but not so, the mind
I wanted to relax
and the chair so inclined
The only agreeable thing
I could find.


I knew a master chief petty office that said, “It now takes all night to do what I used to do all night.”

Besides THAT, is there anything else from your younger days that you miss no longer being able to do or do without having to decide if it is worth the effort?

  • Easily getting up and down off the floor
  • Carrying heavy groceries in from the car
  • Running up and down stairs
  • Staying up past 8 or 9 pm
  • What’s on you list ?

Reblog: The Secret to Being Witty

When I read this article, I knew it succinctly justified why I write this blog. Nice of someone to figure that out for me.

” To Wit, to Woo” to paraphrase the owl

When icicles hang by the wall
And Dick the shepherd blows his nail
And Tom bears logs into the hall
And milk comes frozen home in pail,
When blood is nipp’d and ways be foul,
Then nightly sings the staring owl,
Tu-whit;
Tu-who, a merry note,
While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.

Love’s Labors Lost, Act V (Winter)

Past Tense Verbs-Reblog

Your tenses may give you self-identified life stage away. Geezerette, hear I come.

allenrizzi

Older people seem to have a knack for past tense verbs. I found that out first hand by listening to myself the last few years. I have been through the whole verb evolution thing and here are a few of my observations.

As children, we tend to speak more often in the future tense. We say:

I would like to go to school.
I would like to be old enough to buy gas for my own car.
I will go to college.
I want to be a teacher.
I will write a novel someday.

In mid-life, most of us use the present tense more. We say:

I am going to school.
I am buying gas for my car.
I am going to college.
I am a teacher.
I am writing a novel.

When we get to semi-geezerdom, we often start our sentences squarely in the past tense:

I…

View original post 248 more words

Contronyms–Reblog

Contronym: a word with two opposite meanings, e.g. sanction (which can mean both ‘a penalty for disobeying a law’ and ‘official permission or approval for an action’

If Elvis has left the building, how many people were left behind awaiting his return?

For this and 24 other contronyms, click here

I had to dust all of the pixie dust that Tinkerbell had left behind.

She had to buckle down with her cleaning by buckling her knees to scrub the floor

I hid behind the screen to screen all of the applications waiting for an audition

Yesterday (August 5) was Underwear Day

National Underwear Day is on August 5, so let us brief-ly tell you why we love underwear. It keeps us from ‘jiggling’ in public by covering our unmentionables! Plus, underwear appears in nearly every culture. Today, it comes in all colors, sizes, and fabrics. So all hail our underwear on National Underwear Day!

Semper ubi

Sub ubi

Always wear under wear

National Underwear Day was originally created by the brand Freshpair in 2003, as a campaign promoting a positive body image. Although men were part of the initiative as well, the focus was more on women, and how society perceives their body image. This was during a time when being confident in one’s bare skin was somewhat a new concept, and market trends were rapidly changing. The movement went viral, and National Underwear Day has been celebrated on August 5 every year since.

The first underwear dates back to prehistoric times — with humans wearing a loincloth. During the Middle Ages, men wore linen shorts or ‘braies.’ Women wore a ‘shift’ under their dresses. In Britain, pants were long drawers covering the whole leg. (In fact, the word, ‘panties’ evolved from a shortened version of the word ‘pants.’) But women’s knickers didn’t appear until the 19th century.

While underwear is primarily for protecting clothes from getting stained, the rising demand for lingerie led to more fashionable varieties of underwear. Lady Duff-Gordon of Lucile was the first to create lingerie that freed women from tight corsets. Breakthrough brand Victoria’s Secret was founded in 1977 and made underwear and nightwear both fun and functional for daily wear.

National Underwear Day celebrates boxers, briefs, sports bras, and even some swimsuits. If it is worn underneath your clothing, it is an undergarment worth celebrating!

National Underwear Day was originally created by the brand Freshpair in 2003, as a campaign promoting a positive body image. Although men were part of the initiative as well, the focus was more on women, and how society perceives their body image. This was during a time when being confident in one’s bare skin was somewhat a new concept, and market trends were rapidly changing. The movement went viral, and National Underwear Day has been celebrated on August 5 every year since.

The first underwear dates back to prehistoric times — with humans wearing a loincloth. During the Middle Ages, men wore linen shorts or ‘braies.’ Women wore a ‘shift’ under their dresses. In Britain, pants were long drawers covering the whole leg. (In fact, the word, ‘panties’ evolved from a shortened version of the word ‘pants.’) But women’s knickers didn’t appear until the 19th century.

While underwear is primarily for protecting clothes from getting stained, the rising demand for lingerie led to more fashionable varieties of underwear. Lady Duff-Gordon of Lucile was the first to create lingerie that freed women from tight corsets. Breakthrough brand Victoria’s Secret was founded in 1977 and made underwear and nightwear both fun and functional for daily wear.

National Underwear Day celebrates boxers, briefs, sports bras, and even some swimsuits. If it is worn underneath your clothing, it is an undergarment worth celebrating!

Underwear riffs:

*Diphthong-a sound formed by the combination of two vowels in a single syllable, in which the sound begins as one vowel and moves toward another (as in coin, loud, and side ).

*Dipthong–where your thong disappears into your crack.

*Q: Mr. President, do you wear boxers or briefs? A: Depends.

  • I see Paris, I see France, I see someone’s underpants.
  • What kind of underthings to math teachers wear?

Algebras.

  • Why does a pirate wear underwear?

To hide his booty

*What are your dogs names ?”

“Calvin and Klein”

“Like the underwear?”

“They are boxers.”

Reblog: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/57032/25-words-are-their-own-opposites

Contronym

con·tro·nym/ˈkäntrəˌnim/nounnoun: contronym; plural noun: contronyms; noun: contranym; plural noun: contranyms

  1. a word with two opposite meanings, e.g. sanction (which can mean both ‘a penalty for disobeying a law’ and ‘official permission or approval for an action’).

Read more about contronyms.

He was put out that his girlfriend puts out. (not a true contronym but…)

Wine and Waves

Drinking wine is like a trip to the beach

  • Sometimes wine gently lifts you up and then sets you down on your feet like standing in waist-high water just before the surf breaks, where you bob safely up and down on the gentle swells.
  • Other times wine takes you on an exhilarating journey where you emerge energized and feeling keenly alive from the wave rush to shore.
  • Some wines take you past your depths before thrashing you to the ground, battered and hungover.
  • Then there are the wines that are like rip currents, taking you to places and memories you do not want to visit, but without the ability to escape from the relentless pull.

What kind of wine trip do you like?