Alone–It Depends Upon Your Perspective

All by myself
Don’t wanna be
All by myself
Anymore
From The Song All By Myself by Celine Deon
What does it mean to be alone?  Are you truly isolated by distance, love, feelings, incarceration, faith, being marooned in a distant spot?   Is being alone the same as being lonely?
lone cypres aloneFrom this perspective, the famous Lone Cypress along 17 Mile Drive in Pebble Beach looks quite alone.  It stands alone on its point, the other cypress trees are not visible from this angle.  The haze on the early morning sea seems to heighten the feeling of isolation.
In this picture, you can see the branches of another cypress tree in the foreground solone cypress with perspective that Lone Cypress has neighbors.  Do you have neighbors or friends nearby that you do not notice because of your perspective of being alone?  Sometimes the neighbors may have a different, if not better, perspecive than you do. If you both branch out, you may find a common point of view.
Audrey Hepburn famously said “I don’t want to be alone, I want to be left alone.”
Do you just want to be left alone, or do you want to be alone?  Sometimes we do find our own company the best at a particular point in time.
Do you make a  point of being alone on your point?  Can you see others in the distance but do not feel drawn to them for whatever reason?
Does being a self-diagnosed Introvert or Extrovert add credence to your point of separateness?  Is that the same as isolation?
Is no man (or woman) truly an island?
lone cypress--not really alone
Did you notice how the perspective of the Lone Cypress changes as you move from picture to picture?  It all depends upon which point you stand on to survey what or who is around you.
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An Innovative Way to Use Your Books to Create Art

There was a  bibliofile  who loved books and shoes

But she had so many books she did not know what to do.

Yad Vashem books burnt by the Nazi

This book owner has learned a creative way to use her books as art.

over the moon bookstore and galleryReblogged from the Book Candy section of Over the Moon Bookstore presents Shelf Awareness.:  My Modern Met showcased a book lover who “arranges her huge library of novels into imaginative scenes.”

The colorful pictures are incredible from a mermaid to ying/yang.

 

Book Art Book Displays by Elizabeth Sagan

When Living on the Edge Gives You a Story to Tell

This is unlike any other living on the edge story you are likely to read.   It does not involve living in the fast lane, going outside your comfort zone, or even starting anything new.

It’s a heads or tails kind of story.  You flip a coin:  heads you do it one way and tails you do it another.  One time I was trying to decide what to have for lunch.  Heads would be go out, tails would be eat in.  I searched my pants pocket and pulled out a nickel.

I flipped the nickel.  It did not land on its head.  It did not land on its tail.  It landed on its edge.  Our old stereo had a plastic lid over the turntable.  We had moved and the movers had placed one of their inventory tags on the turntable.  When the tag was removed it  left a sticky residue which had never been cleaned off.  The nickel landed on that residue and did not roll off or fall over.

nickel--recreation of its side view

I have never seen a coin do that and have never heard anyone say that they have had a coin that landed on its edge.

This picture is a recreation of nickel that has landed on its side or edge.

Since the coin could not tell me what to do, I made a sandwich at home and ate it outside.  I am not sure that this would have worked with a smaller coin.  Any other coins I have ever tossed have either landed on their heads or their tails.

Black Jack: Last Army Quartermaster Issued Horse

*Thanks to GP Cox at Pacific Paratrooper for the idea.  His post  today is about Dexter, the Last U.S. Naval Horse.

black jack at kennedy's funeralFor those of us old enough to remember President Kennedy’s funeral, one of many “Kodak” moments was the caparisoned (riderless horse), commemorating a warrior fallen in battle. The beautifully groomed horse with the empty saddle and the reversed boots was Black Jack.  Black Jack was named after General of the Armies, Black Jack Pershing of WWI fame.  He was a coal black, Morgan American Quarterhorse and the last one to  have the U.S. Army brand burned into  his shoulder.

He was born on January 19, 1947 and came to Ft. Myer  in Arlington, Virginia on November 22, 1952 from Ft. Reno, Oklahoma.  In addition to being the riderless horse for the Kennedy funeral, he was also the horse in the funeral for Presidents Hoover and Johnson and General of the Army, Douglas MacArthur.

Black Jack served a 29 year Army career, and was euthanized on February 6, 1976.  His health had declined in his last year and the veterinarian had to get permission  from Department of the Army to euthanize him.  He was cremated and buried on Sumerall Parade Field on Ft. Myer.

His memorial includes the number 3 over  crossed rifles, which is the symbol of the 3rd U.S. Infantry, “The Old Guard”, stationed at Ft Myer, where Black Jack lived.  Caisson platoon was responsible for caring for him and still takes care of the horses used in military funerals at Arlington Cemetary.

black jack's memorial

For more information about Black Jack click here.

 

 

Updated Statistics on the USS Midway Library Naval Institute Proceedings Project

ISSUES

ARTICLES

Published

1,395

12,976

OCT 2011 – DEC 2012

154

1,247

2013

159

1,610

2014

148

1,437

2015

192

1,700

2016

169

1,476

2017

200

1763

JAN-JUN 2018

76

744

JUL-DEC 2018

61

563

TOTALS

1,159

10,540

Pct Completed

83.08%

81.23%

Thanks to Phil Eakins for the statistics and to Bonnie Brown, USS Midway Library Lead Librarian for sharing them with me.

USS Midway and the Naval Institute Proceedings Project

proceedings-first-issueOne of the USS Midway  Carrier Museum Library’s projects is a joint project with the US Naval Institute  in Annapolis, MD.  The Proceedings has been published since  1874 and is one of the oldest continually published magazine in the United States. From Wikipedia;

Proceedings covers topics concerning global security and includes articles from military professionals and civilian experts, historical essays, book reviews, full-color photography, and reader commentary. Roughly a third are written by active-duty personnel, a third by retired military, and a third by civilians. Proceedings also frequently carries feature articles by Secretaries of Defense, Secretaries of the Navy, Chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and top leaders of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard.

Phil Eakins is the project lead.  From  the USS Midway Library webpage.

In a joint project with the U.S. Naval Institute (USNI), we have volunteers reading every article in the Proceedings back to 1874. These volunteers catalog and summarize all important articles from each issue. The volunteer team compiling summaries for the U.S. Naval Institute (USNI) Proceedings Database cruised into its fourth year of work recently in what appears to be a 10-year project. The searchable database, which will eventually be accessible via the USS Midway Museum and USNI websites, will provide interested parties with a valuable research tool heretofore unavailable. Over 5,000 summaries have been completed of a target set of over 12,500 main articles covering the period 1874 to date. As part of the join project, USNI has recently digitized its entire Proceedings collection and will soon have that available on their website.

Phil was kind enough to send me a VT-8 related summary from the Proceedings Project.  Ferrier, the wounded sailor from the VT-8 blog post, wrote this piece when he was a lieutenant in 1964.

 

usni photo of topedo squadron eight
USNI Photo from Ferrier’s article in USNI Proceedings, Oct 1964

 

USNI Proceedings, October 1964, pg. 72

Title: Torpedo Squadron Eight, the Other Chapter

Author: Lt. H. H. Ferrier, USN

Summary by: Bill O’Hara

Torpedo Squadron Eight (VT-8) was commissioned at Norfolk, Virginia, in the late summer of 1941 as an element of carrier Air Group Eight, better known then as the Hornet Air Eight. The first commanding officer of Torpedo Eight, who also led the squadron in their fateful flight, was Lieutenant Commander John C. Waldron, U.S. Navy, a veteran of more than 20 years of naval service. The first aircraft assigned to the squadron were SBN-18s, which were a mid-wing design of the Brewster Aircraft Company, manufactured by the Naval Aircraft Factory, Philadelphia and were used to provide pilot training for this newly commissioned squadron. Following a shakedown cruise by the USS Hornet and her embarked air group in January 1942, the Hornet left Norfolk with the main portion of the squadron and headed for the Pacific.  She left behind a detachment of 80 officers and men who were to be sent to the Grumman factory on Long Island to learn as much as possible about the airplane from the engineers and builders before taking delivery of the new Grumman Avengers (the Avenger tag was given to the airplane after the Battle of Midway to exemplify the mission and dedication of all torpedo squadrons – to avenge the heroic sacrifice of their predecessors.) During this time of testing the new airplane, the first high-speed torpedo drops of a newly designed torpedo which was capable of surviving drop speeds of 125 knots and 125 – 150 feet of altitude were made. Following completion of these tests the planes were flown across country to San Diego to join their shipmates in the Pacific on the Hornet. Because the Hornet was at sea in the Pacific the planes were loaded onto the USS Kitty Hawk (APV-1) in San Diego for transport to Ford Island in Hawaii. Following arrival in Hawaii a message came from Midway Island for volunteers to fly six of the Avengers to Midway.  Upon arrival the planes were prepared for combat which included loading one each of the newly tested torpedoes and ammunition for the two .30 caliber machine guns and the .50 caliber gun. On the morning of June 4, unknown planes were spotted approaching Midway Island and the order was given to take off and find the Japanese carrier force that had been sighted some 15 miles off the coast.  The Japanese force consisted of four carriers and seventeen other ships in formation.  The six Avengers were attacked almost immediately after they had sighted the enemy ships and were outnumbered six to one by Japanese fighters.  Only one of the Avengers made it safely back to Midway Island with one of its gunners killed and the pilot and other gunner severely injured.  Overwhelming odds claimed the other five planes and their crewmembers on that fateful day. Keywords: Naval battles.

 

Maker:S,Date:2017-11-30,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-Y
Bonnie and Pat share the Midway Magic on the Road–at the Naval Institute Proceedings in Annapolis, Mar 2018
Phil get's his 9000 hr award  Apr 2016.JPG
Phil upon getting his 9000 hour pin (He now has over 13,000 volunteer hours.)

 

Additional (Corrected) Info About VT-8

Eventhough I now live in Virginia, I still volunteer for the USS Midway Carrier Museum in their Library.  One of my library shipmates, Carl Snow, provided more accurate information about the crew and layout of the plane.

From Mr. Carl Snow:

In the TBF-1 that VT-8 flew, there were three positions: the pilot, the turret gunner, and the radioman. The turret gunner manned the single .50 caliber machine gun in the powered turret and was almost always an Aviation Machinist’s Mate petty officer. The radioman was in the compartment below and behind the turret gunner and operated the radio equipment. He was an Aviation Radioman petty officer. He had a single .30 caliber machine gun that protruded through a window at the bottom rear of the fuselage, just in front of the tail wheel. If it had to be fired, the Radioman would fire it, but his primary duties were radio communication (he made sure that the pilot’s radio was tuned to the correct frequency and operational, in addition to monitoring any other necessary communication). The “other” .30 caliber gun was mounted forward of the pilot’s cockpit and fired by the pilot through the propeller with an interrupter gear synchronized with the propeller blades. This was soon deleted as inadequate and unnecessary, and replaced by two .50 caliber machine guns in the wings, also fired by the pilot.
AM3 Ferrier was an Aviation Machinist’s Mate third class and not an Airman third class. He manned the turret gun and not the radio, although he could talk to the other two crewmen by internal communication (intercom). Sadly the Radioman did not survive the flight, and AM3 Ferrier was seriously wounded.
Thanks for the correct dope, Carl.
Much obliged,
Pat