National Seed Swap Day-Last Saturday in January

Today is National Seed Swap Day.

National Seed Swap Day on the last Saturday in January serves as a reminder to gardeners that spring is on its way. It is also an ideal time for gardeners to gather and swap seeds in preparation for starting seeds indoors.

The first annual Washington Gardener Magazine Seed Exchange was held in Washington, DC, on January 26, 2006. Kathy Jentz, the editor/publisher of the magazine had the last Saturday of January named an official holiday and National Seed Swap Day was born. After that event’s success, seed swaps in other cities across the nation have joined in celebrating the day each year on (or around) the last Saturday in January.

Seed Libraries are often good places to swap seeds.

A seed library is a place where community members can get seeds for free or for a nominal fee and is run for the public benefit. Many seed libraries are open in public libraries and community centers. For some communities, getting folks to garden and grow some of their own food is the focus. For other communities, seed libraries may be created as an important step to develop a network of seed savers, to create locally adapted varieties, to respond proactively to climate change or loss of gene integrity due to GMOs  or to preserve genetic diversity. Seed saving is something humans have done for over 10,000 years. Rejoin the ritual and start to save seed and share the abundance in your community.

Seed Libraries is a network of seed lending libraries. Seed libraries can vary from community to community, but the basic idea is that seeds are made available to the community for free or at a low cost. Some of the intentions of seed libraries are:

  • increase access to locally grown food
  • social justice
  • local resilience
  • food security
  • seed sovereignty
  • promote seed saving
  • community building
  • preserve and increase genetic diversity
  • pro-active response to peak oil and climate change
  • desire to strengthen genetically honest seed