Female spies of WW2

Women served behind the lines as well as the men. Read about these amazing female spies from WWII.

Back On The Rock

The Special Operations Executive (SOE) was set up in 1940 by the Ministry of Defence. Its purpose was simple – to conduct espionage, sabotage and reconnaissance in Occupied Europe. Of necessity, it was a shadowy organisation.

But, after the War, tales emerged of the heroic deeds of those involved. And many of them were women. Here are the brief stories of two of them.

VIRGINIA HALL, the ‘Limping Spy’, was probably the most famous of the SOE women. Born in Baltimore, Maryland, Hall was aged 34 at the outbreak of war. A gifted student, she followed up her US college life by continuing her studies in Europe. She became fluent in the French, Italian and German languages whilst obtaining a diploma in economics and international law.

Following a shooting accident in 1932 her left leg was amputated below the knee. Thereafter she wore a wooden leg. Thus thwarted in…

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A Palindromic Magic Square for the Year 2019

Although math is a language, it has never been one I am fluent in. This ‘magic’ square is never something I could come up with and it is interesting.

Learn Fun Facts

2019 palinhdromic magic square.png

The above 4 × 4 magic square only has the digits 2, 0. 1, and 9 (from the year 2019) and as a bonus, the four digits in its upper-left section form “2019”. It has a magic sum of 132. This means the sums of the magic square’s columns, rows, and diagonals are all equal to 132. It is also a semi-pandiagonal magic square since it contains some of the features of a pandiagonal magic square, namely:

  • Partial Panmagic Square — The 2-2 broken diagonals (on both sides) of this magic square have a magic sum of 132 as well. For this to be a panmagic square, the 3-1 broken diagonals should also be equal to the magic sum, but unfortunately, this magic square does not have that property. From here on, note that the sum of the cells with identical background colors is equivalent to the magic sum, which…

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